A COMMUNITY SPRINGS INTO ACTION

SIPRA-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
7,000
adults
4,200
children
62
villages
what changed
The districts in the Marathwada region in Maharashtra are among India’s poorest districts. The land is drought-prone; farming is not easy. Many farmers end up taking loans at high interest rates. The resultant high costs of farming and failed crops force many people to migrate in search of work.
Social Institute Programmes Rural Areas (SIPRA) initiated a journey of change in 62 villages that transformed the lives of children and their families. SIPRA began by taking on the region’s most crippling issues – illiteracy and alcoholism. Through a series of interventions SIPRA mobilised the villagers to stand up for themselves.
Today, the women of Himayatnagar are confident about stepping out of their traditional, repressed roles to stop alcoholism.
DONATE NOW
change enabled
711
children enrolled in school
8
schools re-opened
12
health sub-centres reactivated
what changed
Droughts, seasonal employment and migration affect children in the backward districts of Andhra Pradesh. They don’t study; they work. Extra hands however small meant extra income. Though illegal, 400 children were made to work in harsh conditions. Their health suffered too.
Shramika Vikasa Kendram (SVK) has been helping communities in Andhra Pradesh by empowering them to fight child labour, child marriage and secure their family’s future. Guided by SVK, the women in the region decided to grow jasmine. They cultivated it in the fields. Flower sales bloomed, bringing in a string of change. The women’s confidence grew, as did their income. They enabled change for themselves and even employed other farmers.
Now their children are free to learn, not earn. Free to dream and be all they can be.
DONATE NOW

CHILDREN CAN TURN THE WORLD UPSIDE DOWN

project_Gramya-Vikash-Manch
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
500
Bal Sansads formed
18
‘parliament’ sessions held
100%
enrolment in primary schools across 98 villages achieved
what changed
In four districts of Jharkhand – Sahibgaj, Godda, Dhumka, Pakaur – there is rampant poverty, lack of education, few means of livelihood and lack of sanitation. The impact on children was depressing – persistent child labour, child sex abuse and trafficking.
Society for Advancement in Tribes, Health, Education, Environment (SATHEE) enabled children in these districts to form a ‘parliament’ and join the adults in the communities to create pressure groups to demand their rights. SATHEE believes that permanent change can be achieved only through the participation and leadership of children themselves.
Today, in 96% of the villages, child labour has been eradicated and the children, enrolled in schools.
DONATE NOW

A COMMUNITY PROTECTS THEIR CHILDREN

PORD-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
90
villages, 25 slums reached
72
Children’s Collectives formed; 3407 children members
2561
dropouts due to child labour re-admitted to schools
what changed
With broken roofs, absent teachers and no books to study from, the road to education for the children of Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh was one paved with several obstacles. PORD stepped in and helped them get their rightful, quality education.
PORD brought about awareness of child rights, formed children’s collectives and ensured restoration of school facilities. In addition, new classrooms were built, toilets were added, teachers were ensured in the classrooms and anganwadis were built for the children. Health care facilities were provided and hostel rooms were constructed for the children.
Today, 170 girls of the Kasturba Balika Vidyalaya have 4 new rooms in their hostel, with improved facilities, enabling them to continue their education.
DONATE NOW

SLUM CHILDREN ENJOY THEIR CHILDHOOD

PAHAL-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
37
new children enrolled in schools last year
2
Senior Secondary schools sanctioned
Registration of children in school increased to 100%
what changed
Badli is an industrial slum in the north-west part of Delhi. Child labour, poverty and forced migration is rampant amongst the people here. For the adults and children of Badli none of the amenities that one associates with urban life were accessible. Child labour and physical and sexual abuse of children was rampant.
CRY supported Pahal through resources and training, creating a roadmap for issues that needed attention. Pahal created child-friendly environments for the slum children, gradually transitioning them to school. Youth groups were set up to encourage children to voice their concerns.
Today, young girls like Bano Khan can go to school for the first time in their lives, albeit at age 13.
DONATE NOW

CHALLENGED TO CHANGED

MMRCD-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /
change enabled
2,877
children reached in the last 6 years
Confident, optimistic children
Informed, sensitised parents and community
what changed
Coping with various disabilities, 833 children in Chanditala, Hooghly District, face indifference from all quarters. They are denied the respect, the education, and the happy childhood all children deserve. Makhla Muktadhara Rehabilitation Centre for the Disabled (MMRCD) is working hard to give disabled children a life of equality and dignity.
By training teachers and providing equipment and better facilities, schools were made special child-friendly. By interacting with these children and their families, MMCRD educates them about disabilities and makes them aware of their rights as differently-abled children.
Today, children like Iqbal and Rinku have found their place – at home, in school and in the community too.
DONATE NOW

JHADOL – THE FACE OF CHANGE

project_West-Bengal-Education-Network(WBEN)-through-Kajla-Janakalyan-Samity-West-Bengal
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
7
Bal Panchayats formed
4
defunct schools reactivated; 100% enrolment of children 6–14 year-old children
Birth registrations increased to 100%
what changed
In Jhadol tehsil in Udaipur district poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and the resultant lost childhoods are rampant problems. Families are steeped in debt, there is a high prevalence of child marriages, low prevalence of immunisations and the few existing schools lack basic infrastructure.
Mahan Seva Sansthan (MSS) has been working at integrated development by promoting sustainable education, health, environment conservation and livelihood initiatives for the marginalised communities in 46 hamlets of Udaipur district of Rajasthan. MSS employs a community-based model to address each issue in parallel, for holistic and lasting change.
Today, Mahendra Singh, aged 10, is Head of the Children’s Group and is an active agent of change in his community.
DONATE NOW

ENDEAVOUR TO BETTER THEIR LIVES

Kalapandhari-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
9
villages receive safe drinking water
6
Primary Healthcare Centres activated; 100% children immunised
100%
retention of the mainstreamed children achieved
what changed
Every year, a community in rural Maharashtra seasonally migrates for better livelihood opportunities. Children stay out of school and lack of proper medical care and drinking water are commonplace. Adding to their woes are successive years of drought, poor implementation of government schemes, negligible infrastructure and few livelihood options.
Amidst this situation, Kalapandhari Magasvargiya and Adivasi Gramin Vikas Sanstha (KMAGVS), decided to take a holistic approach and address the root causes of Migration and Barren lands. They focused their efforts on Healthcare, Education, Community Mobilisation and Youth Initiatives.
Today, Sarla is the President of the Village Youth Forum and works to create awareness on various issues confronting their community.
DONATE NOW

RESTORING RIGHTS IN MIDNAPORE

KAJLA-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /

change enabled
237
villages reached
13,500
children impacted
Enrolment and retention in schools increased
what changed
The Midnapore area is prone to droughts and cyclones making the soil saline, and the area non-arable. Farmers are forced to migrate, resulting in poverty, child labour, child trafficking and child marriages. Poor teacher-student ratios in schools meant a drop in the quality of education and child welfare.
KJKS intervened and shifted to focus from mere welfare to a holistic approach towards long-term change. Awareness building, community participation and advocacy have played a key role in systematically bringing about change. It is a change that will impact future generations too.
Today, the children of Midnapore have the confidence to stand up to political parties and demand the restoration of their rights.
DONATE NOW

DREAMS COME TRUE

Jago-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /
change enabled
8,816
children enrolled in school
241
children immunised
4
new children’s collectives formed
what changed
Based in the Giridih district, Jharkhand, Jago Foundation was set up in 2004 in response to mass displacement of local communities due to mining and land acquisition programmes. The depletion of forest cover led to a further loss of income and added to their hardship, leading to issues such as child labour, child trafficking and illiteracy.
As a member of the children’s collective group within her village, Tarnum Khatun was aware of child rights and the problems associated with child marriages. When she learnt of her parents’ marriage plans for her, she decided to become an agent of change. Today, this brave and determined 15-year-old girl is continuing her studies.
The right to participation helped Tarnum continue her studies, instead of being a child bride.
DONATE NOW

GOING THE DISTANCE TO GET AN EDUCATION

img-05
0 %
Donation : /
change enabled
4,100
children enrolled in school
293
new births registered
417
children immunised
120
new childrens collectives formed
what changed
In a dusty village in Kutch, Gujarat, Sheetal longed to go to school, play with other girls, talk to her teacher and fill her mind with new ideas. But being born a girl was her biggest barrier to getting an education. The nearest school was a kilometre away. Not too far for the boys, but out of bounds for the girls.
But Sheetal was lucky.
Her mother stood by her. With the support of Gram Swaraj Sangh’s (GSS), she battled local prejudices and helped her daughter to finish school. Having passed Grade 10 today, Sheetal is a confident and independent girl.
Now Sheetal dreams of being a nurse.
CRY-supported project, Gram Swaraj Sangh’s (GSS) approach is to create awareness within the community through children’s fairs and street theatre about their rights to education, health care and basic infrastructure, in a lively and spontaneous way. GSS works across 164 villages in the Kutch area of Gujarat.
Today, girls like Sheetal can rekindle their hopes and chase their dreams because of your support.
DONATE NOW

A BEACON OF HOPE IN A RED LIGHT AREA

Diksha-main-banner
0 %
Donation : /
change enabled
0
child prostitutes
0
children or adolescents trafficked
No underage marriages
what changed
Tumpa Adhikary is a 23-year-old today. But when she was in Class 11 she was forced to drop out of school. Her mother wanted to get her married off. For years Tumpa Adhikary had to listen to her father’s taunts. Her crime? That she chooses to work in Diksha and earn a paltry salary instead of working in the sex trade and earning much more, like her mother did. As one of the founding members of DIKSHA, Tumpa had a fair idea of how underage girls from Kalighat would be thrown back into the flesh trade by their husbands and families.
Diksha, is a youth-run programme in the Kalighat red-light area working towards child protection through direct community participation. Its highlight is the unique rights-based approach – the right to protection and the right to participation of children.
Today, in Kalighat, there is no underage prostitution; young men of Tumpa’s generation have not become pimps and traffickers.
Determined to have a different future, Tumpa convinced her mother to hold on. As a social worker and an ‘agent of change’, she works towards strengthening the community-based systems of child protection – educating children and adolescents about their rights; intervening when any young person is abused – physically, emotionally or sexually. Diksha has helped Tumpa and several other change agents hold their head high.
As an organisation, Diksha believes in the process of change from within. At the core of all this work is the
DONATE NOW