Sona’s Schoolcoming

“I miss my father. I was about seven when he passed away. And everything kept on getting tougher. My mother would cry a lot. Some days we would eat just once in the whole day. I have four brothers and three sisters. All of us started farming in the small piece of land we had. My mother too goes away for days. She goes to the big nearby cities where she works as a farm labourer. I used to stay at home with my sisters and helped them in the household chores. I was good in studies but had to drop out when I was in second standard.”

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Of Rough Hands and Dreamy Eyes…

May was challenging for the young CRY volunteers. Ignoring the scorching and sultry Kolkata summer, they were to be found in the urban slums of the city, and not in the air conditioned malls their peers were frequenting during their holidays. The volunteers were busy conducting summer camps for the children of the Kolkata slums. In one such, a bunch of them met Sabina*. This little girl lives in the interiors of Ballygunj (otherwise known as one of the posh parts of the city). No! where Sabina lives, there are no jazzy shops or eateries, nor palatial mansions. She lives in a shanty, much like her friends.

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On a Mission to Eradicate Child Labour

They say childhood is the most important and fun-filled phase of our lives – the age when you are free of responsibilities, not bound by boundaries and showered with endless affection. A lot of you may agree with this, but more than half of our population won’t. Living in our protected environments cushioned with all sorts of comforts, we forget to acknowledge the harsh reality most people live in.

Let me take you a little closer. As per the National Census, there are close to 10.1 million child labourers in India, in the age group of 5 to 14 years.

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Tiny Shoulders, Big Burdens

The day of the community cultural programme was a busy day for all the kids in the Sonari slum area of Jamshedpur. But, the busiest of them all was the lanky teenage boy- Ganesh, who’d masterminded the whole event.

Ever since Adarsh Seva Sansthan (ASES), a grassroots level non-profit supported by CRY had started work in this slum adjoining the city’s airport; things have been taking a turn for the better. ASES aims to provide a fair, healthy world to the underprivileged children and to bring them to the mainstream where they could have a happy childhood. And, the project’s impact on this colony is actually visible, with there being a real difference in the way the community comes together and takes on responsibilities.

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Books, bricks and a lot more…

 

One of the hardest things to do is break the truth to a child about how the world isn’t as rosy as they are told it is. These words often come from loved ones, parents, family and friends, but when it comes to harsh realities that these very individuals would never wish upon children, they risk raising them in an environment of ignorance. In matters like this, it is up to total strangers to do the needful, often at the expense of seeming purely informative and emotionally removed from the equation.

In an attempt akin to the above, members of the Intern team, here at CRY West, set off to Phoenix Marketcity Kurla, a major shopping centre in east Mumbai to engage with visitors through a few interesting interactions on the occasion of World Against Child Labour Day.

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Back on the right track!

At 14 years, when most school kids are obsessed with movies and friends and gossip, Anitha had her head on a completely different set of things – grazing the landlord’s cattle and doing his household chores. And this would have been her life – a story of untapped potential and lost childhood – if the CRY supported project, Association for Social Economical Educational Cultural Health and Environment Development (PEOPLE) hadn’t rescued her from the venomous fangs of child labour.

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Story of Stopping Child Labourer And an Activist Nestled Inside a Child Labourer

Child abuse in India is not an odd news, it is something that badly needs to be addressed. Here is a story. Naveen is a slight boy with a bright smile. But don’t let this 15 year old’s demeanour fool you because he is a powerhouse. He has just been selected as an Ashoka Youth Venturer by the Ashoka Youth Venture Programme (AYVP) for his community initiatives.

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From taking care of her siblings, to taking care of her own future!

The Tiu family belongs to the Kolha tribes, a Schedule Tribe Community. They are marginal farmers by profession and their livelihood depends majorly on the daily wages. As a community, the Kolha tribe is extremely backwards in terms of economic and social development. Pushpa Tiu (name changed), daughter of Raman and  Kamala Tiu, is a little member from this community in Ranipokhari, Odisha. Like most of the community members, Raman and Kamala make their ends meet with great difficulty. Pushpa lives with her parents and two brothers whom she loves dearly. This is her story!

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THE UNDIMINISHING ACT OF CHILD LABOUR IN INDIA

SOCIAL VALUES IN OUR COUNTRY

India, our motherland is a very versatile country. We have different regions with different territorial variations, cultures and values spanning across various regions in thousand different ways, traditions flowing in our blood, customs that are a part of every Indian household.

These customs and values hold us together and bind us in one nutshell; hence we live by the true spirit of being an Indian. Although India is proud of its achievements, we also have major social issues to be addressed in the country.

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Child Artist’s Position in Indian Film Industry

 

The last decade of the twentieth century saw the impact of economic liberalization on Indian cinema. This is best exemplified by the transition from rickety single-screen cinema halls to plush multiplex theatres. This was followed by a further boost in 1998 when the National Democratic Alliance government granted cinema the status of an industry. The nature of film financing changed and the corporate sector stepped into movie-making.
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“What I can do, I must do”

It was a cloudy day in May when I entered office at 8.45 in the morning. As usual my colleague had already come in and was in the process of ordering the first tea of the day from a canteen in the next door office. I am an avid tea drinker and have numerous cups during the day. She ordered tea for both of us. But it was not the usual delivery boy. My colleague mentioned after a while that the delivery boy looked a bit too young to be working.

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