5 Ways YOU Can Help!

  • Have some free time?
    Volunteer your time and skills, teach, advocate for children’s rights, raise funds, become a changemaker!
  • Really good at something?
    Use your skill to make a difference – it could be anything under the sun, from accounting to photography, from coding to writing for the cause, from data analysis to making films!
  • Witness a child rights violation (child labour, abuse, marriage)?
    Take action. Call 1098, report it immediately!
  • Have resources that could change a child’s life for the better – through education, better health, safer places?
    Pick an NGO that’s working to give children the childhood they deserve and Donate Now!
  • Want to find out other ways in which you can contribute towards creating happy childhoods?
    Visit www.cry.org today!

Empowering Stories with CRY

Firstly, to get this cleared up, there is no particular reason or an objective in choosing to make this donation. I think we’re morally responsible to give back something to the society in whichever possible way. You see, most people have a very linear way of progressing in life. Making a career, like becoming a doctor or an engineer is probably the kids of our generation aspire to be, the brilliant and sincere ones also choose to be scholars and travel places most of us could only imagine. These are all beautiful and realistic ambitions, but on scalar levels it is a tad selfish and most of them turn into adults and they pick up a job with a responsible position in companies, which is only realistic.

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Remembering Rippan…

Remembering Rippan as always on what would have been his 64th birthday….
Every year I sit down to write about Rippan on his birthday and I know if he could reach me, he would yell at me to stop wasting my time and get on with what I have to do. He was like that. Hated talking about himself. Never let people know that he founded CRY. Always referred to the founders as ‘they’. And once when the Rotary wanted to give him an award, he agreed to go only if they gave the award to CRY and he picked it up on our behalf! It’s what allowed CRY to not just survive his premature death, but grow, change and thrive.

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From Vyasarpadi to Indian Football – A Journey of Dreams!

Nandha Kumar is a vibrant footballer from Vyasarpadi, Chennai who currently plays for Delhi Dynamos. But the glitz and the glamour of the world of football and its players is yet to touch him. The younger son to Sekar and Sarasu, Nandha Kumar was identified and brought to the Children’s Collective in his area, run by CRY supported project Slum Children Sports Talents Education Development Society (SCSTEDS) at the age of 7. At that time, his father who used to work as an auto rickshaw driver had to stop working owing to health issues which left Sarasu to earn for the family. She began selling snacks outside school premises which provided the family with just Rs. 3000 to 5000 a month. They lived in a tiny house, with used asbestos sheets for a roof. Nandhakumar and his family survived on a single meal every day and he was completely dependent on the mid-day meals provided in the school.

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She turned it Around – And how! The Victorious Journey of Siya Dulari

There has never been a dearth of inspirational stories in India. From child marriage to abuse, there are several issues people have braved. Out of these, have been born stories like that of Siya Dulari.

Siya Dulari’s story could have been about a child bride who at the age of 14 years found herself abandoned by her spouse and with 3 children to look after and like innumerable such stories her life would have been remembered as an endless saga of suffering.

But Siya Dulari gave her story a different turn. She enrolled herself for schooling and higher studies and completed her graduation. Siya Dulari’s childhood was far from being an ideal one, and thus began her drive to ensure that children lead happy and healthy lives.

Purely on grounds of compassion she started working for the children in her community who were dying of malnutrition. In 2006 Siya was identified by CRY, a reckoned non government organisation and awarded a fellowship. The fellowship gave Siya an opportunity to scale up her work and she now works intensively in 13 villages. It is due to Siya’s efforts that the district and state administration was compelled to take note of the situation of malnutrition among children in the district and take special measures to address the issue. Siya regularly visits the National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights in Delhi, and plays a leading role in deliberating on child rights issues. She holds very strong opinions about child nutrition. Being a discerned individual and someone who has been through so many trying times, her two cents are of high value.

So a 14 year old child who was already a mother of three is now a 38 year old woman making leaps in order to ensure that no child in the Rewa District dies of hunger!

Had it not been for this desire of hers, would she have realized the power that she has within? The power to voice her opinion, sit across the table and share space with senior level government functionaries and legislators clearly driving home the point that no matter what malnutrition among children in the district has to be eradicated. You can join her league too. You can donate to the various causes that are inflicting the society. When you fund for NGO, your money works like a game changer for several Siya Dularis. Your small contribution can change someone’s world. Step up! Donate today!

Know more about her work here.

Life with CRY

This July, I complete my 3 years of volunteering in CRY, and it feels like I have been associated with them since forever, which is partially true because of my parents association with CRY, I will always be a ‘CRY baby’.

But looking at those 3 years, I know things have changed, in kids, in school, in the PAG and above all in me, myself.

I still remember my first class at Jai Bai school and I ended up with moist eyes. I was sharing the class with Varsha didi, the pioneer of our pag in Kalyan, so being the first day we started with introduction, their daily routine and aspirations. And their answers left us numb.

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Coming together for children

How collective action in a village helped bring a school back to life.

A small village of 352 families of Karipatti in Salem district teaches us all the power of collective action.

When a well functioning government high school teaching 150+ children was demolished to dust because of a Four Lane National Highway plan, none of the authorities in the education department came in to protect the rights of the students of the school.

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Child Artist’s Position in Indian Film Industry

 

The last decade of the twentieth century saw the impact of economic liberalization on Indian cinema. This is best exemplified by the transition from rickety single-screen cinema halls to plush multiplex theatres. This was followed by a further boost in 1998 when the National Democratic Alliance government granted cinema the status of an industry. The nature of film financing changed and the corporate sector stepped into movie-making.
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“What I can do, I must do”

It was a cloudy day in May when I entered office at 8.45 in the morning. As usual my colleague had already come in and was in the process of ordering the first tea of the day from a canteen in the next door office. I am an avid tea drinker and have numerous cups during the day. She ordered tea for both of us. But it was not the usual delivery boy. My colleague mentioned after a while that the delivery boy looked a bit too young to be working.

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#EMPLOYEEEXPERIENCES: RESCUING CHILDREN FROM TRAFFICKING AND HELPING RESTORE CHILDHOODS

#EmployeeExperiences:
Rescuing children from trafficking and helping restore childhoods

Child trafficking continues to be rampant in India
with children being moved from state to state within days, sometimes even
hours. Rapid action and swift coordination between authorities can help prevent
such incidents and ensure children are repatriated to their families.

Here Ashim Ghosh, AGM- Development Support CRY (East-working
for
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FROM CANADA TO CRY, WORKING FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

From Canada to CRY, working for community development

With this article, we kickstart a new series of interviews and testimonials from our dedicated CRY interns and volunteers. Volunteering is at the very heart of CRY which was born with Rs. 50 and 7 friends sitting around a dining table wanting to do something. Over the years, as we work to READ MORE