From taking care of her siblings, to taking care of her own future!

The Tiu family belongs to the Kolha tribes, a Schedule Tribe Community. They are marginal farmers by profession and their livelihood depends majorly on the daily wages. As a community, the Kolha tribe is extremely backwards in terms of economic and social development. Pushpa Tiu (name changed), daughter of Raman and  Kamala Tiu, is a little member from this community in Ranipokhari, Odisha. Like most of the community members, Raman and Kamala make their ends meet with great difficulty. Pushpa lives with her parents and two brothers whom she loves dearly. This is her story!



Menstruation – A Taboo No More. Period.

A schoolgirl once stained her uniform whilst on her period. The boys in her class looked on and laughed. She laughed too, at how very naive they were…

Menstrual blood is typically the only source of blood that isn’t induced traumatically. Why then is it such a sensitive issue in a society like ours where child abuse is talked about freely but god forbid someone brings up menstruation during conversation! We live in a country deeply rooted in ignorance and superstition. Young girls across India lack the support they need when they reach this crucial stage in their lives. In most homes, mothers are unable to address menstruation related queries and in schools, the teachers shy away from doing so. This led CRY, an organization that provides child relief and support, to take up the initiative to spread awareness at the grass root level last year.



Gift of a Healthy Life!

Nature is bountiful – and Odisha as a state, has received so much from nature. If one travels across the state, the changing weather and landscape is palpable. The other change that can be noticed is the change in people – their living conditions, economic stability and socio-political scenarios vary quite drastically.

Mayurbhanj is one of the largest districts in Odisha and is famous for its places of interests, mining and agricultural options and lush forest areas. However, in spite of all the opportunities, Mayurbhanj has been featured in the list of the country’s 250 most backward districts (Ministry of Panchayati Raj, 2006).




“Fall seven times, stand up eight.” – Japanese Proverb
This is the story of a young girl who achieved success through sheer determination and grit. Sunitaben Jeevanbhai Vaghela, a 15 year old girl, lived with her family in Gujarat and was appearing for SSC (Secondary Board Examinations) that year. Sunita was a bright child. Hence her parents had lofty expectations of her faring well in the exams and making a mark for herself. However, destiny had something else in store for Sunita. Not only her, but her parents and family members were shattered to know that Sunita had failed in her exams. Heart-broken and thoroughly disillusioned with life, Sunita dropped out of school. Her parents, who too had lost all hopes, became disinterested about her continuing her education. Often, out of sheer distress, they would question her about her failure despite being a smart and hardworking student. They also taunted her saying it would have been better had she not taken up studies at all. Sunita was distraught because not only did she have to deal with the anguish of failing the exam but also had to go through the agony of dealing with her parents’ harsh demeanour towards her.



A victim of gender discrimination yesterday, a civil engineer tomorrow

Being a woman in India comes with its own set of challenges. Gender stereotyping and discrimination on the basis of caste are just about the tip of the iceberg.

The Challenge

In the villages in the Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu, gender discrimination was not only practiced enthusiastically, but was considered the norm. Girls were at a disadvantage from the minute they were born. Even if girls were lucky enough to be enrolled in schools, they had to drop out after primary school. Reason? The only high schools in the area were at least 10 KM away and the only means of transportation was a government bus that ran on no fixed schedule. The private bus was way too expensive. In a place where daughters were considered burdens, parents would never spend such amounts on transportation!




Lack of Girl Child’s Education and violation
of their fundamental rights, detrimental to equitable growth in India

As the world gears up to celebrate the
second International Day of the Girl Child on Oct 11th, 2013 with
focus on innovation for girl’s education, India is still struggling to provide
basic rights to its girl child, points out leading child rights





There are thousands of girls in India who harnesses a dream to go to school, finish their education and earn a dignified living. Unfortunately not all girls enjoy having a choice or option to live this dream. Non-conducive environment, lack of opportunities, and social pressure compels most of the girls to gradually tame their ‘Ichhas’(wishes),READ MORE


She has only half as good a chance as her brothers at good healthcare, at enrolling in school, at not dropping out by Class 5. She is as interested in sports the same as the boys, she likes her dolls but is not beholden to become a mother and wife. In fact she wants to spend her childhood like any



I have only one request.

I do not ask for money

Although I have need of it,

I do not ask for meat . . .

I have only one request,

And all I ask is

That you remove

The road block

From my path.

– Song of an African Woman

When US citizen Sunita Williams literally reached for the stars, Indians back home were ecstatic, for Sunita is of Indian origin!