No Dream is too Distant!

We often take education for granted. However, for a lot of girls in India, education is a distant dream. For a host of different reasons, girls across the country are forced to drop out of school.

But when given the opportunity to pursue education, girls can bring about a cycle of positive change. Not only do they stay away from early marriages and child labour, they also go on to become strong and independent members of the society. As they grow, they make better choices for themselves. Choices that only helps them transform and secure their lives but also grow up to become empowered women capable of influencing their communities for the better.

Jagruti’s story is a live testimony to that.

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The Sky is NOT The Limit!

“The path from dreams to reality does exist. May you have the vision to find it, the courage to get onto it and perseverance to follow it” -Kalpana Chawla

When Muthumanoranjini read about Kalpana Chawla as part of her English curriculum in Grade 11, she was in awe of the fact that a small town girl from her very own country was able to reach for the stars and get there too!

But she could still see some stark differences in her and Kalpana Chawla.  For someone who is part of the Arunthathiyar community, she was constantly being told by society that her community was meant to do only one thing – manual scavenging. In an attempt to break free from it, her parents, with the support of CRY supported Human Rights Education and Protection Council (HREPC), found alternative professions.

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From a dropout to a role model!

The line goes – “When you educate a man, you educate an individual and when you educate a woman, you educate an entire family” – and in fact, education is the only tool with which a girl or a woman can empower herself and eventually her family.

However, in a country like India, poverty often decides whether a girl can continue her education or not. Such is Sumi Godsora’s story as well.

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From Fighting Depression to Being Herself!

13 year old Tithi is known to be the tomboy amongst her peer group. From the slums of south Dumdum Municipality, she lives with her father, grandmother and sister. Her mother left the family last year, leaving Tithi depressed and confused.

For someone already facing issues with peers for not conforming to the gender norms so prevalent in her society, her mother leaving was a big hit to Tithi. Tithi’s mother was the only one in her family who encouraged her passion for dance and left with a father who is detached from them and barely even sees them, her confidence in herself and her abilities dwindled. She was shy and unable to even ask doubts in the classroom.

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Rain Rain, Go Away!

Today is one of those days when the children of New Eden village are coming back home, in their school uniforms, with their tiffin boxes untouched, pages of their books unturned. It’s only 10:30 am and the children could not make it to their school, once again. No, it is not like any other rainy day- this story will continue till the monsoon ends.

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Strengthening Anganwadis across Jharkhand

In the year 2016, in a state level program, the Ministry of Social Welfare, Government of Jharkhand had offered Campaign for Right to Education in Jharkhand (CREJ) – an alliance of grassroots level NGOs supported by CRY, to build model pre-schools in 50 Anganwadis. The model building process was initiated in 25 Anganwadis, in collaboration with Jharkhand State Commission for Protection of Child Rights (JSCPCR), to make it more effective in terms of monitoring and support. Following the guidelines, CREJ has also prepared a complete documentation on pre-school education model building.

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Sona’s Schoolcoming

“I miss my father. I was about seven when he passed away. And everything kept on getting tougher. My mother would cry a lot. Some days we would eat just once in the whole day. I have four brothers and three sisters. All of us started farming in the small piece of land we had. My mother too goes away for days. She goes to the big nearby cities where she works as a farm labourer. I used to stay at home with my sisters and helped them in the household chores. I was good in studies but had to drop out when I was in second standard.”

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